Sign-up today and
stay connected
 

Already registered?
Click
here to log in!
 
Social Animals

 help us on facebook 

You Tube Twitter


ATTENTION: Because of staff shortage, we will only be able to serve a limited number of pets at each vaccination clinic. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Note: Beginning March 5, Vaccination Clinic hours and location are changing. Vaccination Clinics will be held at our main clinic, 3450 N. Kelvin Blvd., on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday beginning at 11 a.m. Because of staff shortage, we will only be able to serve the first 40 pets on a first come, first served basis. Pet owners will now be welcome in the room when your pet is getting a limited exam and vaccinations. If you have questions, please call 881-0321.

headline circle gifAnimal Services > Vaccinations
yellow left table corner   yellow upper right table corner
 
Dog Vaccinations

DAPP
(distemper / parvo / upper respiratory combination)

$10.00

INB Bordetella
(kennel cough)

$10.00

Rabies

$13.00

 
yellow bottom left table corner   yellow bottom right table corner


blue upper left table corner   blue upper right table corner
 
Cat Vaccinations

FVRCP (distemper / upper respiratory combination)

$10.00

Feline Leukemia

$10.00

Rabies

$13.00

 
blue bottom left table corner   blue bottom right table corner

 

To help maintain the good health of your pet, low-cost vaccination clinics are held at the HSSA Clinic at 3450 N. Kelvin Blvd., two blocks north of Ft. Lowell Road between Country Club and Dodge.

11 a.m. Wednesday, Friday & Saturday

NOTICE: The HSSA requires that all cats be securely contained in a cat or (small dog) carrier. Cats can escape easily if not properly contained. (No pillowcases, please!). It is always best to separate multiple cats in individual carriers. If you do not have multiple carriers, for your convenience we offer sturdy cardboard cat carriers for $8.

Dogs must be kept under control on a leash or in a carrier at all times.

Vaccinations gifMethod of Payment:
The vaccination clinic accepts cash, checks, and credit/debit cards.

Other Services:
Microchipping of cats and dogs can also be done at the time of vaccination. Cost for microchip identification is $25.

Deworming is available for your pets. The cost is $10 for dogs, and $15 for cats.

For more information, contact our clinic at 881.0321.

 

 

 

 

 

Headline Blue Circle gifAnimal Services > Vaccination Schedules

 

 

Kitten and Cat Vaccination Schedule >

Vaccination is the single most important investment that you can make in your adult cat’s future good health.  The following are diseases for which we routinely vaccinate:

Feline Panleukopenia Virus:
Also known as feline distemper, Feline Panleukopenia Virus (FPV) is a severe and very contagious multisystemic disease, which most commonly strikes young kittens.  FPV causes anorexia, depression, high fever, persistent vomiting and diarrhea and progressive dehydration.  Additionally, FPV lowers the cat’s white blood cell count, which leaves the cat unable to fight off a secondary bacterial infection.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis:
Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is a highly contagious upper respiratory disease caused by the feline herpesvirus.  FVR is spread by direct contact between cats and by contact with contaminated cages, grooming tools, human hands and clothing, and contaminated food and water dishes.  FVR causes depression, anorexia, fever, and nasal /ocular discharge.  Eye lesions are common.

Feline Calicivirus:
Feline Calicivirus (FCV) is a highly contagious upper respiratory disease that is similar to FVR.  FCV causes many of the same clinical signs without eye lesions and with the addition of oral ulceration, and joint pain.  There are many strains of this virus which can result in a range of clinical signs, from mild to acute death.

Feline Leukemia Virus:
Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) is a severe and often fatal disease which affects the cat’s immune system.  FeLV is spread from cat to cat by grooming, sharing food and water dishes, and sharing litterboxes.  FeLV causes clinical signs which are highly variable, and may include loss of appetite, weight loss, coughing, anemia, a tendency to develop fatal cancers, and immunosuppression.  There is no effective treatment of FeLV at this time.  Cats should be blood tested for FeLV before their first vaccination.

Rabies Virus:
Rabies is 100% fatal to cats and other mammals and there is no treatment.  Rabies can infect people as well if bitten by an infected animal.  Pima County has a relatively high incidence of rabies in its wildlife population, especially bats.  Due to the unpredictable behavior of infected wildlife, even indoor only cats should be vaccinated for rabies.

Vaccination Schedule:
Your kitten should begin its series of vaccinations at 6 - 8 weeks of age.  The following is the kitten/cat vaccination schedule that your pet should follow:

PRC
6 - 8 weeks old: First PRC vaccination (Panleukopenia, Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus)
Then every 3 - 4 weeks until 14 - 16 weeks of age
Then booster annually until 2 years of age
Then can booster every 1 - 3 years depending on the cat’s exposure rate

Rabies Vaccination
12 weeks old (and three pounds in weight): First Rabies vaccination, then booster annually

FeLV
Blood test for FeLV before their first vaccination, and evaluate cat’s exposure before vaccinating.
Begin vaccinating at 10 - 12 weeks of age followed by a booster 3 - 4 weeks later.
Retest at 6 months of age.
Vaccinate every 1 - 3 years depending on risk of exposure.  Adult animals without exposure may not require this vaccine.

 

Dog and Puppy Vaccination Schedule >

Vaccination is the single most important investment that you can make in your adult dog’s future good health.  The following are diseases for which we routinely vaccinate:

Canine Distemper Virus:
Distemper is a severe viral disease that affects many of a dog’s organ systems.  This disease can cause severe permanent brain damage and many other clinical problems including vomiting, diarrhea, and severe secondary infections.  An airborne virus causes distemper.  Treatment for advanced stages of the disease is usually not effective.

Canine Hepatitis:
Hepatitis in dogs is caused by the Canine Adenovirus.  Infectious hepatitis causes severe liver damage, vomiting, diarrhea and death.  Treatment requires intensive nursing care, which includes hospitalization and IV fluids.  The virus is spread from dog to dog via coughs and sneezes.

Canine Kennel Cough:
Infectious Tracheobronchitis, or “Kennel Cough” can be caused by several viral and bacterial agents, and can be found anywhere dogs frequent.  The Bordatella bacterium and the parainfluenza virus are the most common causes of kennel cough.  This disease is usually not serious, but can lead to a chronic and persistent cough.  Cough suppressants or other supportive therapy can be used to relieve discomfort.  Kennel Cough can cause pneumonia and death in severe cases.

Canine Parvovirus:
Canine parvovirus or “parvo” is a highly contagious viral disease infecting dogs.  Young and unvaccinated dogs have higher susceptibility to the disease.  Parvo causes a very severe gastroenteritis that is highly contagious and can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea.  Parvo is spread via direct contact with feces, saliva, and environmental contamination.  The disease is difficult and expensive to treat and usually fatal without treatment.

Rabies Virus:
Rabies is 100% fatal to dogs and other mammals and there is no treatment.  Rabies can infect people as well if bitten by an infected animal.  Rabies is considered endemic in Arizona and Pima County.  You are required by law to have your dog vaccinated for rabies by a licensed veterinarian.  A puppy should have its first rabies vaccination at 12 weeks of age.  The first rabies vaccination that a dog receives is good for one year, and all following vaccinations (with written proof of current vaccination) are good for three years.

Vaccination Schedule:
Your puppy should begin its series of vaccinations at 6 - 8 weeks of age.  The following is the puppy/dog vaccination schedule that your pet should follow:

DAPP
Puppies should receive their first vaccination at 6 - 8 weeks of age 
Then every 3 - 4 weeks until adult dentition erupts (~5 months)
Then booster annually until >3 years of age
Then booster every 3 years

Rabies Vaccination
First rabies vaccination at 12 weeks of age
The first rabies vaccination that a dog receives is good for one year, and all following vaccinations (with written proof of current vaccination) are good for three years.
You are required by law to have your dog vaccinated for rabies by a licensed veterinarian

Bordetella
Intranasally (both nostrils) every 6 to 12 months depending upon exposure.  Check with your boarding facility to make sure that you are compliant with their stated policy of vaccination frequency.

 

Return To Top Blue Arrow jpg

 

 

 

Affordable Spay/Neuter for your pet - click here

Faithful Friend - Automated Giving Plans

       
Home  |  Printer Friendly  |  Tell a Friend  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Statement  |  Site Map
  |  Copyright 2014  |  The Humane Society of Southern Arizona